Our professional womenswear Digital Block Patterns are based on UK sizes use by international fashion designers, pattern makers, students and home sewers.

Click here for Size Chart
Purchase digital block pattern

1. Purchase digital block pattern

Assemble digital block pattern together

2. Assemble block pattern together

Transfer Onto Study Card Or Paper

3. Transfer onto sturdy card or paper

Arranged onto A4 sized pages for you to print out on economical A4 printers and assemble together; transfer onto manilla or oaktag card to create your own block patterns. The individual pages are printed with a frame so they can be connected frame to frame, later. “The definition of a block is any pattern without seam allowance from which other patterns are designed, also called basic pattern, block pattern, or foundation pattern”.

How To Assemble Full Size Block Patterns

1. Open the files in Acrobat Reader.
2. On the print settings:
Do not select ‘scale to fit’ or ‘crop’.
Do ensure that ‘None’ is selected on the ‘Page Scaling’ option.
Print each pattern piece singled sized A4 setting.
3. Each page of the block is numbered to help you assemble the block. When the print is complete, you can see (<) marks along each edge of each page that guide you in accurately assembling and taping together the printed block overlapping each sheet.
4. Transfer your printed block pattern onto sturdy card. Mark all the relevant lines and pattern information on your master block patterns.
5. The blocks are joined horizontally.
6. That’s it. You are now ready to start creating your own personalised wardrobe!

Included in your download

1. Pdf full size block pattern
2. How to assemble block pattern
3. Metric & Imperial size chart

Check Out the Digital Block Pattern Collections…

4 category (one size) block patterns

 5 category (one size) block patterns

graded block patterns

What is a Block Pattern?

A block pattern is a basic garment shape from which a pattern is drafted from as a starting point. Also known as a basic template, from this clothing patterns are created with different design variations. Pattern cutters use basic pattern shapes and adapt draft patterns each season to create clothing collections with different wearing ease for fitted, semi-fitted and loose fitting shapes.

“The definition of a block is any pattern without seam allowance from which other patterns are designed, also called basic pattern, block pattern, or foundation pattern.” Ease is the amount of “space” in a garment beyond the body measurements; the specific amount of ease will vary from style to style.

digital-downloadOur PDF Digital Block Patterns are arranged onto A4 sized pages for you to print out on economical A4 printers and assemble together; transfer onto a sturdy card to create your own block patterns. The individual pages are printed with a frame so they can be connected frame to frame, later.

Purchase the sturdy card from trade supplier in sheets or a roll. After connecting your A4 pdf digital block pattern pages together with magic tape, transfer onto durable card ie: Manilla card or Oaktag for longevity, staple the paper block pattern to the card and cut on the edge of the black solid lines and keep your original A4 block pattern intact. Each time you make a paper pattern, trace around your master block (card template) onto spot and cross paper pattern, create your new draft pattern and shapes adding seam allowances, hems etc. The great advantage of our Digital Block Patterns enables you to print off and travel light. The block patterns are (NETT) no seams.

Our professional womenswear Digital Block Patterns are based on UK sizes use by international fashion designers, pattern makers, students and home sewers.

Click here for Size Chart

Wearing Ease
Minimum wearing ease: – used for a layer of clothing on the body – Tops, Skirts, Shirts
Medium wearing ease: – used for garments that form an intermediate layer – Jackets
Maximum wearing ease: – used for garments that form the outer layer – Coats

Ready-to-Use Digital Block Patterns 
Professionally drafted full-size blocks used in the fashion industry
Sizes 6 – 20 individually print out onto A4 paper
All the block patterns are (NETT) without seam allowances or turnings
Wearing ease is included with each block pattern i.e: Bodice – minimum 
Each block pattern set includes a size chart, block pattern piece information and instructions to assemble together to create your fabulous fashion patterns

Purchase your digital graded block patterns and create your designs
create your designs with block patterns
creating a collection

DIGITAL BLOCK PATTERNS

Graded block patterns

CATEGORIES

pc-folder-bodice

pc-folder-skirts

pc-folder-shirts

pc-folder-dresses

pc-folder- trousers

pc-folder- jackets

pc-folder-coats

Check Out the Digital Block Pattern Collections…

4 category (one size) block patterns

 5 category (one size) block patterns

graded block patterns

You’re here right now because you’re interested in creating clothing patterns using our Ready-to-Use professional digital block patterns. Maybe you’re new to the subject or looking to return to pattern cutting and need a block pattern as a starting point. Sometimes we don’t have have the option or time to learn how to draft blocks from scratch so my philosophy is pretty simple… give people the solution with our digital block patterns.

A passion for pattern cutting

I’ve had a passion for fashion pattern cutting and sewing for many years, I studied fashion design at The London College of Fashion where we learnt flat pattern cutting using ready made block patterns as a starting point. Once we developed the basic skills and techniques required for pattern development we learnt how to draft block patterns using our own measurements.

Fashion design tools

These are the necessary tools and equipment that you need for fashion pattern cutting to make a huge impact in your fashion career or project.

1st Class Patterns: Digital block patterns

We’ve made it super-easy for you to start making your garments straight away with our digital block patterns. They each have different wearing ease for you to select from minimum, medium and maximum for the bodice, skirt, sheath dress, shirt, princess-line dress, trouser, jacket and coat.

EXAMPLES USING OUR DIGITAL BLOCK PATTERNS

1st Class Patterns: Digital block patterns

The shift dress block pattern used to make this dress has minimum wearing ease, it sits close to the body. I altered and reduced the woven shift dress block pattern to make it into a stretch dress block. The amount taken out on the width of the original block pattern depends on the stretch of the fabric for the final garment, the dress is also lined with stretch lining. The result is this red dress made from stretch silk satin.

1st Class Patterns: Digital block patterns

The jacket block pattern has medium wearing ease so you can wear a shirt for example under it. This jacket was constructed with the style lines wrapping around the body from the bust through the front pocket and around to the back vent to give the jacket a tapered fitted look. The fabric is a stretch pinstripe wool, the jacket is fully lined.

1st Class Patterns: Digital block patterns

Whilst the coat in this example requires a closer fit on the body the jacket block pattern with (medium wearing ease) was used. This coat can also be made from the coat block pattern which has maximum wearing ease so the wearer can wear a layer of clothing i.e shirt and sweater on the body.

DIGITAL BLOCK PATTERN COLLECTION

1stclasspatterns.com - 4 category digital block pattern to create your styles.
1stclasspatterns.com - 5 category digital block pattern to create your styles.

When selecting a block pattern you need to choose the correct wearing ease for the garment before you begin making your pattern. In our digital block pattern collection, we have the option for you to choose from a 4 and 5-category (one-size) block pattern set, this includes – 4 category: coat, one dart skirt, jacket, princess line dress and 5-category: sheath dress, two dart skirt, shirt, bodice and trouser. The wearing ease range from minimum, medium and maximum (see below).

1stclasspatterns.com - Graded digital block pattern to create your styles.

The other option is our graded digital block pattern, here you have the option to select from a bodice, one dart skirt, sheath dress, trouser, princess-line dress, two dart skirt, jacket and coat. The wearing ease range from minimum, medium and maximum (see below).

Fashion companies, designers, pattern makers, students and home sewers use our digital block patterns to create from one style to complete collections from ready-to-wear to the high street.

3 Types Of Wearing Ease
Minimum wearing ease used for a layer of clothing on the body – Skirts.
Medium wearing ease used for garments that form an intermediate layer – Jackets.
Maximum wearing ease used for garments that form the outer layer – Coats.

PDF Digital Block Pattern
Arranged onto A4 sized pages for you to print out on an economical A4 printer and assemble together; transfer onto a sturdy card to create your own master block pattern. The individual pages are printed with a frame so they can be connected frame to frame, later.

Ready-to-Use Digital Block Patterns
Professionally drafted full-size blocks used in the fashion industry
Sizes 6 – 20 individually print out onto A4 paper
All the block patterns are (NETT) without seam allowances or turnings
Wearing ease is included with each block pattern i.e: Bodice – minimum
Each block pattern set includes a size chart, block pattern piece information and instructions to assemble together to create your fabulous fashion patterns

The womenswear digital block patterns consist of the following
Bodice: Half front, half back with shoulder and waist darts and semi-fitted sleeve
Skirt: Half front with waist dart, half back with waist dart
Shirt: Half front, half back and sleeve
Dress: Half front with bust darts, half back with shoulder darts and semi-fitted sleeve
Princess Line Dress: Half front, half back and semi-fitted sleeve
Trousers: Half front with waist darts, half back with waist darts
Jacket: Half front with bust darts, half back with shoulder darts and semi-fitted sleeve
Coat: Half front with bust darts, half back with shoulder darts and semi-fitted sleeve

1stclasspatterns.com Online Courses: Pattern Cutting | Fashion Draping | Sewing

Are you ready to get creative and become a #1stclasspatternmaker?

Dive in and download your Digital 4 and 5-Category or Graded Block Patterns HERE and tell us what you’re going to make in the comments below, or post on your social media platforms using the hashtag #1stclasspatternmaker we would love to see all your makes.

If you have questions, we have answers, if you want to know something we might have missed, drop us a line!

Pattern Cutting Beginners Course

It’s been a long time coming…

Before I could put pen to paper I needed to know if people were interested in learning pattern cutting to industry standards, so we sent out surveys before outlining the online beta course and yes if anyone’s asking it takes a lot of planning, research and preparation when you’re creating fashion courses whether it’s for an education establishment or for online. You have to take yourself out of the box with all that you know and visualise the step by step learning process, level and the outcome through the eyes of a learner before putting the course together in your mind and then in reality.

When I started teaching on fashion courses I was asked to create courses on pattern making and sewing, I found it very difficult to put the courses together at the time I had experience working in the fashion industry but no formal teacher training this was years before I gained my PGDHE certified teacher training at Dr Martin Shobens fashion college. It wasn’t until I was actually studying to become a fashion teacher that I realised the amount of work that’s involved in creating courses. Incidentally, Martin was also one of my pattern cutting lecturer when I attended London College of Fashion and later when I graduated I continued learning my craft in pattern cutting, fashion draping and grading at his evening classes for many years; which if you didn’t know where brilliant, Martin was a fantastic methodical teacher.

Pattern Cutting Beginners Course - notebooks

I’ve got this thing about sketchbooks, ideas books and notebooks I guess that’s my creative side, I like to put pen to paper and write, draw, create samples and mind-map through all the stages of the course in detail before I start creating the content. Transferring your knowledge onto a beginner is not always easy especially when everyone learns at a different pace, so we’re creating the in-depth video training course at a steady pace to test, improve and iron out any parts with our beta members because you can never tell if a course is up to scratch until you have learners run it through the mill. Pattern Cutting Beginners Course - materials needed

You will need to purchase specialist pattern cutting equipment and have a dedicated work space to complete the assignments. If you have limited space purchase a pair of fold-up trestles and a sheet of MDF to place on top, store the MDF up against a wall when not in use. A materials list will also be included for you to purchase all your equipment and have them to hand before you start the online course, you will also need to set aside time to go through the course materials and complete the assignments, this can be done around your schedule. Pattern Cutting Beginners Course

The videos are between 7 – 12 minutes long, set out into modules inside a private members area with training library materials, downloads, homework and more. Creating the content for this course has been really exciting, I love seeing all the content come together and I know I always say this, I so wish I had resources like this when I was a student.

If you are interested in learning womenswear pattern cutting at beginners level join us here

Can you remember?
30 years ago today: 23 July 1986 - 23 July 2016

30 years ago today my creative work was unveiled to the world…

30 plus years in fashion industry - Sarah Ferguson's veil, bodice and dress fabric
When Sarah Ferguson walked down the aisle and married her prince, HRH the Duke of York prince Andrew at Westminster abbey on the 23 July 1986 and became the Duchess of York.

30 plus years in fashion industry - Sarah Ferguson embroidered front wedding dress

I assisted Lindka Cierach to design and create Sarah’s royal wedding dress, her four bridesmaids dresses for Zara Phillips, Alice Ferguson, Laura Fellowes, Lady Rosanagh and an identical royal wedding dress for Madame Tussaud’s.

30 plus years in fashion industry - Sarah Ferguson at her wedding dress fitting

We also attended the royal wedding at Westminster abbey on this day thirty years ago.

Royal family and guest at the Royal wedding - 23 July 1986
30 plus years in fashion industry - Royal wedding cake 23 July 1986
30 plus years in fashion industry - A gift from Sarah Ferguson 23 July 1986

After completing two courses in 1985 at The London College of Fashion the first in textile machine embroidery and the second in fashion design I started working as part of a team of three in Lindka’s converted attic studio in Fulham, London as a junior assistant designer, pattern cutter and maker in couture when Lindka was commissioned to make Sarah’s wedding dress.

Meet the Team

Ezmé Anderson

Rosa Kabido

Lindka Cierach

It seems like yesterday…
X Ezmé Anderson

Students will be able to take an A-level in Fashion for the first time ever under plans unveiled 19 May 2016 by exam board AQA with the first students taking the exam in 2019.

bridging-the-gap-students

As a certified fashion educator, this is fantastic news; I’ve been waiting in anticipation for this standalone qualification for a very long time. In my needlework lesson, many moons ago we had to choose our favourite designer and complete a project about them. I choose Mary Quant because she was the only designer who sent me back lots of information bearing in mind I had sent off letters to lots of designers. If I can find the information she sent me I’ll post it on the blog.

As part of the new course students will be studying the work of influential designers such as Chanel, Dior, Mary Quant, Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin, Vivienne Westwood, Gaultier and Alexander McQueen with an in-depth look at and the impact they have had on fashion, textiles, design, and manufacture.

The new standalone qualification replaces the long-standing ‘Textiles’ course. Students will create their own designs, learning how to use a variety of textiles and new design technologies and they will study the commercial side of fashion, including branding and marketing.

The new qualifications place greater emphasis on understanding and applying iterative design processes. Students will use their creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values.

The plans for AQA’s new Design and Technology: Fashion and Textiles A-level, which will be available to teach from September 2017.

bridging-the-gap

You may ask why have I been waiting in anticipation for this A-level in Fashion standalone qualification. I remained in contact with my art and needlework school teachers who encouraged me to pursue my passion of designing and sewing until they both passed away, so often they would suggest I go into teaching which I always kept in the back of my mind. I graduated from London College of Fashion in 1985 after studying two courses in textile: machine embroidery and fashion design. I started out in the industry as a designer, pattern cutter, and maker and In 1986, I assisted Lindka Cierach to design and create Sarah Ferguson’s two royal wedding dresses for her marriage to HRH Prince Andrew. After a few years in the industry, I became a certified fashion educator in higher education. Click to learn more about me here.

4-module-course

Fast forward to last year, I was approached by several schools that came across 1st Class Patterns on the internet to mentor their students who were interested in a career as a fashion designer. Since then I’ve been creating and testing the “Taster Fashion Course” to assist pre-16-year old students, so far I’ve had an overwhelming response from teachers looking to help out students gain a real understanding of what it means to be a fashion designer in the industry.

This creative and thought-provoking four-module online course give your students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in the fashion industry. They will also receive the knowledge and skills sought by further, higher education and employers. The course includes pattern cutting, fashion draping, sewing skills and the crème de la crème fourth module is where I dive deep into the FE level fashion design project and break down the design brief and assignments with step-by-step instructions, video lessons, handy helpers and much more. Students study at their own pace with feedback from my team and me.

To your student’s success, Ezmé

sign-up-students

What are your thoughts on the first ever Design and Technology: Fashion and Textiles A-level course? I would love to know in the comments…

Tools and equipment for fashion design, pattern making, draping, sewing

Over the years, I’ve accumulated lots of tools and equipment that I use for pattern making, sewing and craft projects. You could say one of my guilty pleasures is shopping for fashion design and sewing tools, I know how strange I hear you say. I’m not the only girl that does this, my fellow creative friends can relate to this.

When I was a student my siblings and I use to let’s say disagree when it came to my scissor and its usage. It’s funny when you say to someone they can’t use your fabric shears to cut random things it becomes a heated debate. I’ve invested a lot of dollars in my tools from the get-go because I wanted to get good mileage out of them before they become collector’s items.

OK, let’s dive in; these are the fashion design, pattern cutting and sewing tools and equipment I can’t live without, even if I tried. Just having the correct tools and equipment makes my job even more of a pleasure to do. I’ve always told my students to keep their tools in a tool bag or box, it preserves them. I remember my first week at fashion college we made a sewing tool bag in our pattern cutting and garment construction lesson and yes I’ve kept the tool bag but I don’t use it. It’s become a collector’s item.

 

1. Nothing beats having a comfortable pair of scissors to cut fabric especially when you’re cutting all day. I use my card scissors to cut manila card, it’s heavy with a short blade and a long handle. When you cut along a pencil line on card using the length of the blade you end up with a smooth cut line whilst resting the scissor on the table, the main reason why I like to use a mechanical pencil with a 0.3mm lead.

CARD SCISSORS

I like using these lightweight scissors when I’m cutting lining, silks and fusible interfacing. It has long blades and what’s good about this type of scissor is the scissors rest on the table as you cut the fabric.

LIGHT WEIGHT SCISSORS

This type of fabric shears is heavy like the card scissors, I have a collection of scissors that I use for varies types of fabrics wool, silk, net, linen and cotton with the size ranging from small to large.

FABRIC SHEARS

2. When I’m collaborating with a designer, company or fashion house I always have a set of block patterns that are made to the client’s specifications, this enables me to crank out flat patterns effectively.

block-pattern-collections

3. I’ve got a thing about mechanical pencils. I like to use a 2h or 4h 0.5mm lead pencil when I’m drafting and creating patterns on pattern paper. When I’m teaching online I sometimes use an HB or coloured pencils with a 0.5mm lead so it’s visible on the screen.

2/4h MECHANICAL PENCIL

When I’m transferring the pattern onto manila card then I’ll use a 3h 0.3mm lead pencil purely for accuracy and precision.

3mm MECHANICAL PENCIL

 

MECHANICAL PENCIL REFILLS

4. Over the years I’ve used a pattern maker, fashion curve and a set square. These can be used to create patterns, draw straight lines, add seam allowances, mark in hip-lines, grain-lines, establish 45 and 90-degree angles, neckline curves, shape armholes, measure around curves, use as a compass and grade patterns. One of my students gave me a beautiful set of see through grading rulers from China and I’ve been attached to these bad boys ever since. Their very light, compact and it also has 0.5mm and 0.7mm markings.

PATTERN MAKER

 

FASHION CURVE

 

GRADER SET SQUARE

5. Omg I couldn’t leave home without Alice and Co. I was first introduced to Alice and Co when I started Fashion College. It just made so much sense to invest in a professional dress stand of my own; frankly, it’s a pain to do fittings in the mirror. You can make the dress stand larger by making covers in larger sizes to fit on your size 10 dress stand, just like they do at Dior fashion house.

DRESS STAND

And co is the half scale dress stand I use when I’m demonstrating making patterns to students or when I collaborating with a designer or fashion house to create couture collections using expensive fabrics.

HALF SCALE DRESS STAND

6. My tape measure usually spends the day around my neck. I don’t like tape measures that have a 2cm metal tip on the end because it’s covering a part of the measurements. It has to be fiberglass all the way; the others I find tend to stretch or the markings fade really quickly. I use the a narrow tape measure when I’m working on small scale, this allows me to measure in the most smallest places on the pattern on whilst measuring on the stand.

TAPE MEASURE

7. Whenever I need to create style lines on a 3d design (on the stand) I use either adhesive styling tape or cotton stay tape with pins. I don’t use the adhesive styling tape directly on the stand because it makes the stand become sticky after a while, so I create a duplicate body and place it on the stand and then use adhesive styling tape.

5MM ADHESIVE STYLING TAPE

 

5mm COTTON STAY TAPE

8. I’m a stickler when it comes to sewing pins; I use the colour headed long pins for the majority of projects i.e. silk, lace, jersey etc. I don’t like machining over my pins as they become blunt and it also ruins my sewing machine.

DRESSMAKERS PINS

 

MAGNETIC PIN HOLDER

9. This is my faithful friend my pattern notcher, this particular one I love because the notch is 0.3mm wide. Others I’ve used in the past have a 0.5mm notch. Can you imagine a pattern without notches.

3mm PATTERN NOTCHER

10. This professional spot and cross pattern paper is widely used in the industry by pattern makers to create paper patterns, it’s available in various widths on a large roll or you can purchase small quantities.

SPOT AND CROSS PATTERN PAPER

I also use plain pattern paper to sandwich fluid fabrics like crepe satin or Georgette in between then I place my pattern on the top with weights sometimes with clamps before cutting out, you have much more control and this stabilizes the fabric.

PLAIN PATTERN PAPER

11. You’ll be amazed at the amount of scotch magic tape you use each season. I prefer to use the magic tape because it does what it says on the tin (whenever I write, draw and erase pencil lines its like magic).

MAGIC SCOTCH TAPE

12. I use different size pattern weights to hold fabric and paper in place they are a god sends especially when I’m working on a large bridal or red carpet gown. Pinning and cutting volumes of fabrics can be very time-consuming.

SMALL PATTERN WEIGHTS

 

VARIOUS SIZE PATTERN WEIGHTS

13. Last but not least is (drum roll please) my industrial sewing machine. Whenever I sit at my machine I cruise off into another world… I have wonderful memories of when I first started sewing with my mum at the age of seven. This bad boy is a must if you’re doing lots of sewing or you could use a good quality and sturdy domestic sewing machine. Just make sure you test out various sewing machines before you purchase the chosen one.

INDUSTRIAL SEWING MACHINE

In a nutshell, when you invest or have the correct tools and equipment for any job, boy does it make your life a whole lot easier.

 

Are you new to fashion design, sewing or crafts check out my list of tools and equipment that I’ve been using in my studio since “Diana Ross was #1 with Upside Down” in the UK charts here.

What’s Inside Your Fashion Design Studio or Tool Box? Tell us in the comments below so we can geek out together…

Level: Intermediate

I’ve always loved designing and making jackets whether it be a bomber, casual or tailored jacket. Back in the day as a fashion student, I use to make lots of jackets in leather, corduroy, wool, cotton and silk. I was always in fabric shops, collecting samples, experimenting with colours, fabrics, trims and creating toiles (some of them unsuccessful).

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - pinstripe fabric

Fast forward to today I created this classic single-breasted jacket with a twist that I love! I’m tinkering if I should also make a drop waist slim fit trouser to accompany my jacket, let’s see how I get on.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - materials

The wool pinstripe fabric I’m using for this jacket has stretch across the width. I always crutch up fabric in the palm of my hand for a couple of minutes just to see how much it creases. This fabric I adore not only does it hold it’s shaping it presses up really crisp. So in order to give this jacket even more of a crisp sharp look, first I’m going to blocked fuse the whole body and sleeves with light weight fusing which also has stretch across the width using a press cloth.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - taffeta lining

Choose your lining to match your fabric or use a contrast lining. The lining I’m using is acetate and taffeta with 10% stretch across the width, swan stretch thread and shoulder pads.

Purchase your jacket block pattern here

First off design your jacket, download your jacket block pattern here, decide on the fit and finish length of your jacket. I’m working on the left side of the garment stand. Trace off the left front, right back jacket block (eliminate the waist darts) and left sleeve block pattern onto spot & cross pattern paper. Remember to add your finished length. Our jacket block pattern has medium wearing ease so you can wear a shirt underneath.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - back shaping

The back jacket with additional width reduction and shaping.

To create a stretch block pattern for this jacket style reduce (fold out) the front & back block width (the total depends on fit required). (Note that your new block pattern may require additionally width reduction and shaping, this will be done on your garment stand or model).

Raise the jacket shoulder to accommodate shoulder pads (optional), add the button stand, collar break line, mark on the roll collar, fish dart, hem allowance, add your seam allowances. Block fuse your fabric using a press cloth and cut out in toiling fabric. (Make sure to use toiling fabric that is of the same weight as your final fabric).

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - matching pinstripes

If you are using fabric with a pattern ie: pinstripe you’ll need to match the stripes, pin in place and cut out your pattern pieces.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - front shaping

Place the front jacket on the stand and secure with pins. Place the back jacket on the stand and secure with pins. Pin down the centre front to the CF seam on the stand. Pin out the bust dart and create a curved seam from the bust point down towards the lower hip line (Tip: use styling tape to mark the position of your curved seam).

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - incorporate a pocket into seam

I’ve incorporated a pocket in the curve seam (optional). Make sure the front curve seam flows nicely towards the side seam and beyond.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - back shaping

Pin down the centre back seam to the CB seam on the stand. Using your pins create a seam from directly below the back shoulder dart down towards the hemline.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - two piece sleeve

I’ve created the sleeve as a two piece with a vent on the sleeve hem.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - jacket toile on stand

Stand back from the garment stand and check the front and back seams you’ve created, check the collar roll and sleeve pitch re-adjust if necessary.

Mark in your seam lines using tailors chalk either on the stand or place the toile on your cutting table, remove pins and lay the front and back toile flat and transfer toile onto a fresh sheet of spot & cross pattern paper. True your pattern pieces, add seam allowance, pattern information cut out the pattern and sew the toile together.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - front and back jacket toile

Fit the toile on the stand, adjust if necessary on the stand with pins. Mark off with tailors chalk and transfer toile adjustments to your pattern.

Creating a fitted jacket using a block pattern - jacket toile

Pinstripe jacket with lining.

Are you creating a jacket or clothing collection?

You might also love our digital block pattern collection size 6-20 HERE

Graded block patterns to create your fashion patterns
Download-now-2

WOMEN’S WEAR
All digital block patterns are drafted separately for you to create your styles
• Professional ready-to-use
• For fashion designers, pattern makers and sewers.
• Arranged onto A4 sized pages for you to print out on economical A4 printers
• Each set includes a size chart, block piece information and instructions to assemble together
• All the block patterns are NETT (without seam allowances or turnings)
• Wearing ease is included in each block pattern

What pattern or sewing projects are you working on? Tell us in the comments below we’d love to see.

I’m learning a lot and so will you.

Step by step video courses
Developing training courses in the online fashion library membership site

I am often asked, “Can you teach me professional fashion pattern cutting or sewing sometimes both?” with the regular emails that I received from my audience requesting online classes constantly reassure me that there is a demand for my expertise that was part of the reason why I decided to create this online library. When I started out on this fashion library creation journey I had a few things in mind for the new membership site. The first was to make the online fashion library the place to go as well as learn fashion design, draping, pattern cutting and sewing to fashion industry standards. We aim to deliver content that is of value to our audience in addition to making our membership platform affordable. When I attended London College of Fashion in 1980 (back when Diana Ross was #1 with Upside Down), internships and placements had not come to fruition yet. However, I made use of the Yellow Pages and my home telephone once I had discovered my passion, ironically, on a bus journey through Oxford Street.

london college of fashion

London College of Fashion – University of the Arts London

Over the years, collaborating with designers, fashion houses and teachers has expanded my skills and allow me to transfer my knowledge onto my students. For the best part of my life I’ve been creating lesson plans, teaching in both Further and Higher education (MA, BA, Diploma, Foundation, under and Post-Graduate Degrees) whilst collaborating with global luxury brands creating collections for fashion weeks, red carpet events, made-to-measure and one off commission pieces.

My career - 30 yrs Industry Experience | 21 yrs Teaching | 9 Industry Sectors | 1 Online Fashion Training Library

A lot of the time design students want to become fashion designers, but here’s the thing unless you want to launch your own label, there are only so many openings for these positions each year. You’ll find that design houses will have an army of pattern cutters collaborating alongside one or a group of designers working in different segments of the company, ie: main-line, bridal, active, eveningwear.

Tip: Learn everything you can on your creative journey. Why? Because you never know when that perfect job offers will come to life. Design houses, designers etc seek out those that can multi-task and get the job done.

My graduation collection: Machine embroidery incorporated into knitwear, with hats and bags.

My graduation collection: Machine embroidery incorporated into knitwear, with hats and bags.

Example: When I attended Fashion College I always made sure I was one of the first to complete a project. Why? As a child, I had my “fingers in many pies” (as they say). My mum taught me how to sew and my dad was a cobbler. Long story short, I’ve been surrounded by creative people from a young age. I carried this mentality through to adulthood making sure I stood out from other students. Why? Because it helped me remain focused on my end goal.

Designer, Creative Pattern Cutter | Certified Fashion Educator | Entrepeneur of 1stclasspatterns.com

Designer, Creative Pattern Cutter | Certified Fashion Educator | Entrepreneur of 1stclasspatterns.com

I started to find it difficult, splitting my time with working as a designer, pattern cutter, teaching and developing my online fashion library. It was definitely time for me to sit down and decide which direction I wanted to pursue. As you probably have guessed, I decided to reduce the amount of time I spend in my other ventures in order to concentrate on my fashion library with my team. My dad celebrated his 84th birthday in August inspired me and said: “Whatever goals you have, do it now while you’re on the planet and while you are able to”.

The other reason I started the fashion training library was because I wanted to pass on my skills and knowledge I gained in the industry to future generations after working in nine industry sectors. Designers have expressed they are finding it hard to find multi-skilled creative pattern cutters, sample makers as well as several of the designers asked me to train their pattern cutters with my skills and knowledge from my time in the industry till now, and that’s a lot of years, needless to say, a lot of pattern cutters to train. Who would have thought!

Developing the fashion draping beginners video course - Lights | Camera | Action...

Developing the fashion draping beginners video course – Lights | Camera | Action…

The first day I started filming the draping course for the fashion training library I had so many re-takes I was almost able to identify with what it’s like to be on a movie set… take 1… 07… 13… 🙂 On a serious note, having the camera positioned in front of me and creating the course was a daunting new experience for me. When your designing or creating patterns at work you just get on with, the same for teaching students I just did my thing. I constantly forgot where I was because I was distracted by the camera, crew as well as the lights.

Now one of the best parts of my job is the opportunity to interact with you on a regular basis as well as creating the content for the growing online fashion library.

Developing the beginners, intermediate and advanced levels courses

Now one of the best parts of my job is the opportunity to interact with you on a regular basis as well as creating the content for the growing online fashion library. I’m looking forward to getting to know where you are in your creative journey at the moment and how I can assist you to reach your ultimate goals. The online fashion library is shaping up nicely as you can see below with members like you joining from around the globe…

The online fashion training library was launched with the fashion draping course for beginners // 1stclasspatterns.com

The online fashion training library was launched with the fashion draping course for beginners

My goal is to help you achieve your goals, create a pathway in the fashion industry or project . . . starting with the foundation in the online fashion library that leaves no guesswork and sets the stage for your success in the industry or your projects! We provide you with easy to follow step-by-step video tutorials, training materials, feedback, ongoing support and much more to fashion industry standard.

It’s your moment, make it count!

It's your moment, make it count! - 1stclasspatterns.com

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